Team

Verena Schmid
  • Verena Schmidt

  • Verena Schmid
    Germany, born in 1989

    Education

    • 10/08-01/14: Diplom in Engineering Mathematics at Technische Universität Dresden
      Thesis: “How to Avoid Defects in Hexagonal Structures on Surfaces with Negative Gaussian Curvature”
    • 09/11-05/12: University College Cork, Ireland
    • Since 09/14: University of Southampton, PhD student

    Professional Experience

    • 07/2010 -10/2010: intern  at Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics, Department Acoustics, Software  in Stuttgart, Germany
    • 05/2011 – 07/2011: student research assistant at Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics, Department Acoustics, Software in Stuttgart, Germany
    • 01/2013 – 06/2013, 08/2013 – 12/2013: student research assistant at  TU Dresden, Institute of Scientific Computing  in Dresden, Germany
    • 06/2014 –  08/2014: software engineer  at  Systemhaus Scheuschner GmbH, EDV-Systeme in Frankfurt (Oder), Germany
    • Since 09/14: Research Engineer at Siemens Industry Software N.V. in Leuven, Belgium

    Project description: Geometry-enhanced Methods

    Supervisors: Gwenael Gabard, Hadrien Beriot , Onur Atak

    Applying high-order field representation methods in numerical simulations allows us to decrease the number of elements used for the computation. But if the geometric order of the elements is kept small using e.g. standard linear elements, the quality of the geometric description will be adversely affected by the mesh coarsening.  An unsufficient geometric description can be the bottleneck of high-order simulations.

    The main objective of this part within the CRANE project is to investigate the enhancement of the geometric description in aero-acoustics simulations. Possible techniques are the use of high-order Lagrangian elements or a CAD description such as in NURBS-enhanced finite element method (NEFEM). Different approaches will be considered and compared with a focus on robustness and industrial applicability.

    To improve the computational performance of the methods, the accurate mapping and interpolation of boundary conditions and mean flow data will be investigated, as well as quadrature rules to meet the demand for high-order integration.

Alice Lieu
  • Alice_Lieu_adjusted

  • Alice Lieu
    France, born in 1990

    Education

    • 09/08-06/11: Bachelor in Mechanical Engineering , University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France
    • 09/11-10/13: Master in Fluid Mechanics, University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France
    • Since 02/14: University of Southampton, PhD student

    Professional Experience

    • 05/2012 -09/2012: internship, Comparison of two numerical models for the simulation of a thermoacoustic engine, LIMSI, Orsay, France
    • 03/2013 – 09/2013: internship, The effect of Galileo number on the dynamics and wakes of freely rising and falling spheres, IMFT, Toulouse, France

    Project description: High accuracy methods for frequency-domain flow acoustic

    Supervisors: Gwenael Gabard, Hadrien Beriot

    High-frequency acoustic problems call for fine meshes which leads to the resolution of large linear systems. Limited by the current computer memory capacities, the convected wave equation in heterogeneous media and at high wave number is therefore challenging to solve.

    The aims of the project “High accuracy methods for frequency-domain flow acoustics” are to investigate efficient high-order methods for aero-acoustic propagation. The work is divided into two parts. A first part involves the discretisation methods used to solve the convected wave equation and the second part involves the solver aspects.

    Most of the computational aero-acoustics tools used in industry still rely on low-order discretisation methods which suffer from great pollution error at high frequencies. It has been proved that the efficiency with which one models short waves can be increased by using high-order methods. Its principle is the use either of high-order polynomials or of local solutions of the problem. The first part of the work is dedicated to the comparison of two high-order methods (polynomial high-order finite element method and wave-based discontinuous Galerkin method). Previous studies demonstrate that both methods lead to a control of the dispersion error associated with low-order finite element method at high frequency. Our comparison aims at determining the most efficient method in the mid and high frequency regime.

    For industrial applications, direct solvers are usually used for robustness reasons. However, the large systems to be solved at high frequency lead to unreasonable memory requirements. Domain decomposition methods emerged as powerful ways to bypass this problem. The idea is to split the numerical domain into smaller sub-domains and solve the problem in each of the sub-domains. Domain decomposition is therefore also well-suited for parallel computing. The techniques have to be deployed, integrated with other aspects of the simulation process and validated for large-scale industrial application.

Michael Williamschen
  • photo_Michael

  • Michael Williamschen
    United States, born in 1989

    Education

    • 08/2007 – 05/2011: Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering at Iowa State University
    • 09/2011 – 10/2013: Master of Applied Science at the University of Toronto
      Thesis: “Parallel Anisotropic Block-Based Adaptive Mesh Refinement Algorithm For Three-Dimensional Flows”
    • Since 03/2014: University of Southampton, PhD student

    Professional Experience

    • 04/2010 – 04/2011: intern at Sukra Helitek Inc. in Ames, Iowa, USA
    • 05/2011 – 08/2011: intern at Pointwise Inc. in Fort Worth, Texas, USAct of Galileo number on the dynamics and wakes of freely rising and falling spheres, IMFT, Toulouse, France

     

    Project description: High-order DGM for time domain LEE

    Supervisors: Gwenael Gabard, Hadrien Beriot

    My project focuses on the development of the time-domain discontinuous Galerkin method (DGM) for the solution of turbofan exhaust noise problems governed by the linearized Euler equations. These problems are challenging to solve due to having disparate spatial and temporal scales, placing limits on the attainable accuracy and efficiency of the scheme. My research involves better understanding the accuracy and stability limits of the DGM for exhaust noise problems and developing new techniques, such as adaptive methods, to improve the computational efficiency. The DGM will be applied to the solution of realistic, three-dimensional exhaust noise problems to analyze the broadband and tonal noise, including interactions with wing and pylon geometries.

     

Simone Mancini
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  • Simone Mancini
    Italy, born in 1988

    Education

    • 09/2006-09/2009: BSc in Aerospace Engineering, University of Rome “La Sapienza”
      Thesis: “Criteri di Selezione dei Materiali per Impieghi Ingegneristici: la Metodologia dei Diagrammi di Ashby” (Criteria for Engineering Material Selection: The Method of Ashby’s Diagrams).
    • 10/2009-01/2012: MSc in Aeronautical Engineering, University of Rome “La Sapienza”
      Thesis: “Analytical and Stochastic Aerodynamic Models for Stability and Response Aeroelastic Analyses of Wings with Ground Effect”.
    • Since 01/2014: PhD student at Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton – Institute of Sound and Vibration Research.

    Professional Experience

    • 09/2011 – 01/2012: Internship at CNR – INSEAN (National Research Council, Instituto Nazionale per Studi ed Esperienza di Architettura Navale ) The Italian Ship Model Basin, Department of Structural Dynamics and Fluid-structure Interaction, Rome, Italy.
    • 04/2012 – 10/2012: Research Assistant at CNR – INSEAN (National Research Council, Instituto Nazionale per Studied Esperienza di Architettura Navale ) The Italian Ship Model Basin, Department of Structural Dynamics and Fluid-structure Interaction, Rome, Italy.
    • 10/2012 – 09/2013: Structural Systems Design Engineer at Rolls-Royce plc, Bristol, UK.
    • Since 01/2014: Research Engineer at Siemens Industry Software N.V., CAE Vibro-Acoustic Group, Leuven, Belgium.

    Project description: Computational methods for large-scale prediction of aircraft noise radiation

    Supervisors: Jeremy Astley, Gwenael Gabard, Michel Tournour

    Commercial aviation is facing the reduction of aircraft noise as a major challenge, and significant efforts are invested by research institutes and industries to understand, predict and reduce aircraft noise. Ramp and community noise certifications need to be rigorously accomplished. For this reason, including aircraft noise prediction into design cycles is a primary need.
    The project aims at developing novel methods and procedures to improve accuracy and efficiency of the predictions for aircraft engine noise radiation. The project is focused on developing new computational methods capable of predicting noise propagation over large-scale domains with complex geometries. The main applications are the so-called installation effects, namely, the effects of the components of the airframe on the sound radiated by the engines and the auxiliary power units. The aim is to benchmark the numerical methods available to predict noise radiation in large-scale domains for aeroacoustic problems and develop solutions to improve these predictions. Mean flow effects on wave propagation and radiation in unbounded domains are the main physical implications. Scattering from the airframe by accounting for radiation from aeroengine intakes is the reference application for the development of numerical methods.